Iconic American Infrastructure: Hartsfield-Jackson Airport

Taking off on the right path
Atlanta

 Hartsfield-Jackson had its beginnings with a five-year, rent-free lease on 287 acres (116 ha) that was the home of an abandoned auto racetrack named The Atlanta Speedway. The lease was signed April 16, 1925, by Mayor Walter Sims, who committed the city to develop it into an airfield
Hartsfield-Jackson had its beginnings with a five-year, rent-free lease on 287 acres (116 ha) that was the home of an abandoned auto racetrack named The Atlanta Speedway. The lease was signed April 16, 1925, by Mayor Walter Sims, who committed the city to develop it into an airfield
As part of the agreement, the property was renamed Candler Field after its former owner, Coca-Cola tycoon and former Atlanta mayor Asa Candler.
As part of the agreement, the property was renamed Candler Field after its former owner, Coca-Cola tycoon and former Atlanta mayor Asa Candler.
 The U.S. government declared it a military airfield and the United States Army Air Forces operated Atlanta Army Airfield jointly with Candler Field in October 1940.
The U.S. government declared it a military airfield and the United States Army Air Forces operated Atlanta Army Airfield jointly with Candler Field in October 1940.
 In 1946 Candler Field was renamed Atlanta Municipal Airport and by 1948, more than one million passengers passed through a war surplus hangar that served as a terminal building.
In 1946 Candler Field was renamed Atlanta Municipal Airport and by 1948, more than one million passengers passed through a war surplus hangar that served as a terminal building.
 Work began on a new $21 million terminal which opened May 3, 1961. It was the largest in the country and could handle over six million travelers a year.
Work began on a new $21 million terminal which opened May 3, 1961. It was the largest in the country and could handle over six million travelers a year.
  • Construction began on the present midfield terminal in January 1977. It was the largest construction project in the South, costing $500 million.

 

  • In May 2001 construction of a 9,000-foot fifth runway began. It was completed at a cost of $1.28 billion and opened on May 27, 2006.

 

For more information visit
www.sixthstreetviaduct.org

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